Perry Glasser

Archive for May, 2014|Monthly archive page

STUDENT DEBT – THE NATIONAL ROAD TO PALOOKAVILLE

In Business, Economics, Economy, EDUCATION, Political Economy, Politics on May 7, 2014 at 11:05 am

Buccaneers, those captains if industry who have offloaded their training costs to trainees, are sending themselves and the United States on a one-way trip to Palookaville.

If we create a generation that cannot afford new housing, cannot afford new cars, are unable to purchase or  enjoy the fundamental goods and services our economy provides, hesitate to marry, delay child-bearing, we will arrive in Palookaville.

The American economy is choking itself to death, and is doing so at the expense of youth.

The Crisis

Evidence that we face a crisis abounds. Dollar$ does not have to work hard to make the case. Student debt is now greater than all credit card and mortgage debt, surpassing a trillion dollars.

student tuition earning Fortune Magazine

student tuition earnings
Fortune Magazine

 

Dollar$ does not imagine this calls exclusively for a financial remedy.

Yes, for a decade and more, the cost of higher education rose faster than any other sector of our economy. Policies pump money into Education with no incentive on Education to reduce costs. Administrators proliferate, non-teaching personnel pop up faster than toadstools in Oregon after rain, the teaching-productivity of professors decline.

But blaming the greed of higher education for the debt crisis is like complaining that ticket prices at sports events are too high because professional players are overpaid.

This is America: wages and compensation are set by markets, and the rule of markets is whatever the traffic will bear. Every CEO loves that rule.

Mortgage and Students

Consider: when money was pumped into the mortgage market, the resulting balloon and eventual collapse rocked the world economy in ways from which it has still not recovered.

The similarities between that mortgage market and the market for student debt are breathtaking—quasi-government agencies, favorable loan rates, and loose regulation.

But there is a difference: a mortgagee can walk away from real estate and leave banks owning worthless property, students cannot walk away from their education. They get to keep what is in their heads.

In fact, we have passed laws that safeguard student debt — not students — even in bankruptcy.  Should a former student go broke, they can seek financial relief in Bankruptcy Court, but no court will release anyone from student loans.

The only way out of student debt is death.

So with apologies to followers of Senator Elizabeth Warren, other well-intentioned Weasels, and the legions of Wizards ever-eager to brew a new potion of loan and grant combination to foist on youth, Dollar$ maintains the solution is not to make higher education “affordable.”

The solution is to champion higher education as an entitlement.

Education must be free.

The Platform

Access to two years of higher education is a right of every citizen.

This is no money giveaway, though the usual Blue Meanies will choke on it.

The program is necessary for the preservation of our democracy, the maintenance of our standard of living, and to liberate forthcoming generations from a lifetime of debt.

In 1944, The United States passed the GI Bill, which promised every veteran free tuition and living costs while in school. Who among us would call that bad policy?  The United States embarked on a rising tide of growth that benefited every economic class.  The lesson was plain: general education benefits us all.

If Buccaneers tell us the United States is engaged in economic war, why are we taxing only youth in our war effort?

Why do the same patriots who grouse that in terms of education “America is falling behind,” insist that the cost of keeping educational pace with the rest of the world is one that must be borne by students?  When did accruing debt to the point of guaranteeing a lifetime of indentured servitude become an act of patriotic obligation?

Why do the same Buccaneers who grouse they cannot find sufficient employees with the “right” job skillset insist that the cost of training be borne by trainees who are speculating about what higher order skills will be needed in the near and distant future?   When did the phrase “will train” drop from the language of employee recruitment?

 Dollar$ calls for free higher education through the 14th grade.

 

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