Perry Glasser

Archive for June, 2014|Monthly archive page

ESCAPE THE STUDENT DEBT TRAP??

In Business, Economics, EDUCATION, Finance, Personal Finance, Wall Street Journal on June 14, 2014 at 10:04 am
St Milton, Nobelist  in Economics, Doyen of the Right.

St Milton, Nobelist in Economics, Doyen of the Right.

Finding new ways to pump money into education as Miguel Palacios seeks to do in today’s Wall Street Journal, is no more than leaning on the bicycle pump with greater vigor to inflate the tire. We saw it in real estate with substandard loans: now we are seeing it again with financial schemes that do little more than bleed profit from students ill-equipped to endure debt no matter how it is structured. Income-share agreements a la Milton Friedman will not rescue higher education until higher education rescues itself, and higher education will not rescue itself until it has incentive to do so. Friedman’s idea was fine, 5o years ago, but the pump today is attached to a balloon already stretched to contain trillions. How much longer can it inflate?

First, let’s address the proliferation of “professionalized” administrators whose experience of classrooms is nil, and let’s limit their compensation to a single-digit multiple of teaching personnel. We can do this at any US school accepting US money—which is all of them, public and private. Should any private school express horror, all it needs to do is stop accepting Federal funds in the form of student loans: then the Trustees can then pay a president anything they wish.  If it is good enough for Harvard, it is good enough for Oral Roberts University.

Second, let’s reconsider what we want higher education to be. Do we have the courage to stop equating “education” with “training?” Are our children empty vessels to be filled so they may take their places at the machine, or do we want to train our children to be thinking leaders?

Third, outsourcing job training to prospective employees has to stop. “Hit the ground running” is a metaphor drawn from images of troops dropped into combat from helicopters, but business leaders whose strategic horizons rarely extend beyond the next quarter have to close their copies of Sun Tzu and stop thinking of employees as conscripts. At these prices, youth will eventually not enlist. When that happens, business throughout America will go into a death spiral. Who will be buying the goods and services when an entire generation is already so underwater no one can borrow to buy houses and cars? Before we demand that youth borrow tens of thousands of dollars to mold themselves to a vision that business itself will discard in a heartbeat, and before telling laid-off employees to “retool,” let’s see the return of ad that read, “College grad wanted. Will train.”

Another productive college grad.

Another productive college grad.

Fourth, scrub campuses clean of cruise ship personnel, those pleasant folks who for 10 months each year deliver non-teaching services to students. They account for more payroll than all teachers. Can’t a campus go forward without offices devoted to diversity, racial and ethnic education, and the rest of the panoply of politically correct educational goals with no cognate in the real world? Can an academic year pass without barbecues, fairs, or Frisbee competitions?No wonder kids are lured into majoring in Women’s Studies or Conflict Resolution: they’ve gotten the notion that such careers exist.

Finally, for those of us who demand American employees be competitive and fear they are not, consider the long view on American education. Literacy meant mandatory education through 6th grade, then 10th grade, then 12th grade. Do we have the vision to acknowledge that American prosperity and security at this time requires a population that can access education through the 14th grade? Are we brave enough to say it? — education is an entitlement because it promotes a public, widespread good.

The question is not whether we can afford it, but whether we can continue to pretend that we cannot.

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