Perry Glasser

Archive for the ‘FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS’ Category

WALL STREET PERVERSITY

In Business, Economy, EDUCATION, Finance, FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS, Politics, Wall Street on February 9, 2018 at 5:26 pm

Dollar$ notes again that the financial community seems to be insane. Buccaneers and Wizards confound the simple Citizen who needs a money harbor other than a pillowcase. Until someone invents bedding that pays interest or dividends, that is likely to be a bad idea.

screwed1

Citizen

You may have read that the markets are down because of too much good news.

It’s true.

January 2018 saw a market run-up of breathtaking scope. The Weasel-in-Chief was smugly taking credit and taking Olympic Gold for World’s Worst Comb-over (Orange Division). Kids on the street were selling their bicycles and holding bake sales to pick up some bitcoin, wait a day or two, and then cash in expecting in a day or two to have enough money to buy a private Caribbean island that would be closed to those short-sighted ever-selfish Baby Boomers who ruined the Earth by inventing cell phones, expanding civil rights, and creating cheap birth control that begat Hook-Up culture, all while stupidly neglecting to shape a world where no one would have to work.

Mean or what?

WHEN GOOD NEWS IS BAD NEWS

The good news that rattled the markets is that more people are working and that the people working are earning more money. Wall Street, naturally, near soiled its underwear.

The bad news was that many people persist in believing that economies are a zero-sum game. If the notion of I win, you lose! rules the markets, what could be more awful than Citizens getting a bigger piece of the pie?

More people, more jobs, more money, that’s bad.

R-i-i-i-i-i-ight.

 

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TREES DON’T GROW TO THE SKY AND OTHER TRUTHS GRANDMA TAUGHT ME

In Business, Economics, FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS, Personal Finance, Political Economy, Wall Street on February 6, 2018 at 3:42 pm
(modified from a post originally written in 2017)

Simple Truths

  • The stock market neither advances nor retreats–though prices indeed go up and down.
  • For every buyer, there is a seller.
  • When buyers and sellers agree to prices, they set asset values.
  • Buyers buy with the expectation of future profit; sellers sell when they believe continued ownership of an asset constitutes a risk no longer commensurate with possible reward.
  • No one in a free market is under compulsion to sell, buy, or participate at all.
  • Wall Street is neither a battleground for territory, nor  an adversarial contest.
  • It’s a market.

Wizards require small investors to believe that generals understand the battlefield and so deserve your trust and your fees because they otherwise have nothing to sell.

Market Sentiment

After getting into the game by buying 3 to 5 broadly diversified vehicles, you should do nothing. Nada. Nothing at all. In 2017, if you followed that strategy, you made mere 20%. In January of this year, the froth of your beer bubbled up, but the winds of February blew them away.

Throw thyself off no bridges. You are still 20 percent ahead of a year ago.

Since the vast majority of investing operations on Wall Street and the bourses around the world are performed by networked machines that monitor every price tick and move great mountains of capital for millions of worldwide financial vehicles, there is no human sentiment involved. Understand: When you as a small investor get the news of sharp price movement, it is too late to act, unless you think and make decisions at light speed and happen to be a Cray computer.

  • Machines do not agonize over decisions such as Buy, Sell or Hold.
  • Machines have no hearts. Machines do not succumb to sentiment. Machines do not read the newspapers.
  • Machines do not hold on to send their kids to college.
  • Machines do not save pennies to accrue the down payment on a house.

Nevertheless modern Wizards want us to believe market sentiment exists and that they are plugged into that sentiment.

Yeah. Sure. Right. Got it. Roger that.

How do TV Wizards get away with recommending buying or selling new assets every day?

kramer7

Sells perpetual panic and urgency

A Warning

Dollar$ is aware that sharp price moves can be precipitated by events and non-events such as national elections, earthquakes, floods, train wrecks, and planet-killing asteroids. Only that last may have an impact on your buy and hold strategy, and Dollar$ is unsure of that.

If you think the US is going to hell in a handcart, do you also believe that after the crap hits the fan that the money you buried in the backyard will buy a can of tuna?

This is why reasoned investors await blood on the floor before buying, and unless you are within 5 years of a financial goal–retirement, your kid’s first year of college, that down payment on your house–sit tight, never sell, buy steadily, take advantage of dollar-cost averaging, and sip better whiskey.

  • Buy and hold.
  • Ignore alleged “corrections.”
  • Sleep at night.

(modified from a column originally published in December 201)

CITIZENS & TUMBLING STOCKS

In Business, Economics, Economy, EDUCATION, Finance, FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS, Personal Finance, Politics, ROBERT REICH, SOCIAL MEDIA, Wall Street on February 5, 2018 at 7:27 pm
jimmy-stewart

investor

Dollar$ readers have asked for a comment on the recent path of stocks falling off a cliff. Though Dollar$ seldom references perturbations in the market, in this case he will make an exception because any number of people with brains of tapioca or in possession of advanced degrees will point to this event to declare it political, a referendum of sorts on Donald Trump for whom they hold unsustainable rage.

 

THE AXE OF RAGE 

Rage as a political stance is unsustainable because it consumes its object as well as those who revel in it. We grind that axe at our own peril.

That won’t bother pundits such as Robert Reich at Berserkely. Expect his gloating to surface in a day or two while his cadre of unsalaried graduate student do his work for him.

After all, Reich persuaded thousands of Facebook followers that Spring rain, the demotion of Pluto from planet to rock and back again, and your most recent dose of athlete’s foot, were all ploys by the rich to separate you from your money because there is no bottom to the depth of their greed. (Except for St. George Soros, who sends wheelbarrows of Canadian cash to political causes in the United States out of simple generosity, something that most of us would find curious if the cash came from Outer Slobbovia or Russia.) The Professor has yet to mention the President’s promise to go after Big Pharma or his championing “the right to try” to give the sick access to medications stalled in the FDA’s long system for approval. How could Reich do so? His followers might dial back their rage, and then who’d buy the Professor’s books, subscribe to his videos on Netflix, or line up to enroll in his one class per year in a lecture hall packed with the beneficiaries of privilege, those students at Berserkeley who on cue wildly applaud before marching to deny free speech to someone else?

To be sure, Professor Reich will neglect to mention that the trillions lost on world markets in the past few business days have mostly been lost by the rich. Who did you think owned the shares of companies? Your barber?

Also, make certain you know, that Dollar$ believes our President to be at base a lout, a racist, sexist, and probably a compulsive adulterer who happened to revolutionize American politics by seizing on social media as a means to create a bridge between himself and voters when his own party and the American press gave him all the chances of a balloon in a pin factory.

Benjamin-Franklin-U.S.-$100-bill

Chastity?

None of that, by the way, makes him unfit to join the ranks of John Kennedy, Franklin Roosevelt, Dwight Eisenhower, or Bill Clinton. There were many others; the folks who brag about zero tolerance for white male sin remain eager to rewrite history by expunging ordinary men from the presidential rolls. God help us if they figure out what the Founders did with their time when separated from spouses for months, and that rascal, Benjamin Franklin, was not know for his chastity.

Fortunately, The Donald did not run for Pope.

STOCKS

Dollar$ is happy to report the sky has not fallen, at least not in my neighborhood. If Jemima Puddleduck races past your front door, Dollar$ urges you to unwrap that shotgun you received as a gift from Grandpa. Go bag yourself an inexpensive cheap chicken dinner.

Responsible financial advisers will tell you to do nothing: Dollar$ agrees, unless you have a working crystal ball in which case Dollar$ would appreciate a call. All the elephants could not get through the door without the house collapsing. That’s what happened today.elephants

DECISIONS

What now? Better to ask: Where would your money be better off?

The world economy is peachy.

The American economy is also peachy, showing healthy signs of continued growth.

Do not confuse the economy with the stock markets. After a run-up of 21% in a year, market algorithms were bound to get nervous.  (Algorithms don’t properly get nervous, but the notion of market sentiment is a joke when upwards of 90 percent of all market transactions are conducted by computers.)

The American economy is in danger of suffering wage-inflation. Prices will rise because Joe Doakes, his cousin Joe Six-Pack, and their cousin, Jane Doe, are earning more.

O, the Horror! What will Reich say if people are earning more?  What fraud is being perpetrated that will need a decade to play out?

RELAX

The past week has seen a drop of 5 percent. More is coming.

Bear in mind that historically, a 7 percent gain in a year is good news. If after the carnage we saw today and can expect for a few more days your 401-k, your kids’ 509, and your savings ratchet back to a “mere” 12% annual gain, try not to swoon.

Stay  the course. There are bulls, there are bears, and there are pigs. People who try to time the market—that is, sell now with the hope and expectation of buying it all back when things have settled—are pigs , and like pigs will be slaughtered.

BITCOIN & SAD MILLENIALS

In Business, Economics, EDUCATION, Finance, FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS, Personal Finance on February 3, 2018 at 1:18 pm

It’s hard to be sympathetic.

Several years ago, Dollar$ started plainmoneytalk to offer explanation and instruction about financial matters to the naïve and young. Someone had to.

Big honkin’ financial websites and advisory services run by Wizards have a vested interest in making what is basic seem complicated, the better to charge for magical advice no one should need.

buzzard

Credit Card Company

Personal Finance instruction at high schools is abandoned after explaining checkbooks, possibly because teachers themselves are uncertain of how banks, credit cards, car insurance and all the rest fit together. Young Citizens are left baking in the sun along the roadside, tasty meals strewn meal for carrion credit card companies who feast on the dead.

Dollar$ refrains from specific investment advice, the realm of Buccaneers and Wizards who cover their asses by couching advice in subjunctive mood: If XYZ Corp does not go up, it might go down!  Yes, well, other than standing still, there is no third alternative. There is, however, lots of deniability, and the advice applies not only to investments but to hydrogen airships navigating through lightning storms. If it does not go up like the Hindenburg, it will do just peachy.

hith-hindenburg-

Financial adviser: “But look how well they are doing at the front of the ship!”

The four personal financial functions – Saving, Investing, Spending, Insuring (SISI) — have been explained by Dollar$ in the past. Underlying the advice are a few principles, the hallmark of which is Get Rich Slowly.

BITCOIN TODAY

So it is with a heavy heart but some smug self-justification that Dollar$ observes that in the past two months, the eager sweaty Get Rich NOW! Millennials, nurtured on tales of college drop-outs making billions in weeks and because of weak toilet training remain puzzled by the concept of delayed gratification, have gotten kicks in the head and keister. (Why do we never read of the legions of Ivy League dropouts who lost Mom and Dad’s fortune by investing in systems to convert lead into gold?)

Bitcoin and other “digital currencies” took a beating, dropping a bruising 60 percent from a high of $19,783 in December 2017 to (gulp) as low as $7,700 last week. That’s 60 percent, and the fun is not yet over.bitcoin

Someone will offer a postmortem—increasing regulation around the world? invisible North Koreans getting out of the game until after the Winter Olympics?—but the fact is that at any time  they could have read Dollar$. With any luck, we have seen the last of this worldwide swindle put together for the greater glory of sex traffickers, arms dealers, dope runners, and terrorists.

Dollar$ does not like saying, “I told you so” because it is like kicking  corpse, but in this case will make an exception.

 

TREES DON’T GROW TO THE SKY or WHY RHETORIC WILL LEAVE YOU BANKRUPT

In Business, Economy, Finance, FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS, Personal Finance, Wall Street on December 17, 2017 at 2:11 pm

Simple Truths

  • The stock market neither advances nor retreats–though prices indeed go up and down.
  • For every buyer, there is a seller.
  • When buyers and sellers agree to prices, they set asset values.
  • Buyers buy with the expectation of future profit; sellers sell when they believe continued ownership of an asset constitutes a risk no longer commensurate with possible reward.
  • No one in a free market is under compulsion.
  • Wall Street is neither a battleground for territory, nor  an adversarial contest.
  • It’s a market.

Wizards require small investors to believe that generals understand the battlefield and so deserve your trust and your fees because they otherwise have nothing to sell.  Internet access to mutual funds, closed-end funds (CEF) and  exchanged traded fund (ETF) has made giving professional advice a media game.

Sell newsletters, attract viewers, collect advertising dollars.  You need not be wise or even right. Scare the piss out of customers, and they come back anyway, thrilled that you were wrong. If God-forbid the doom-saying prognosticators prove to be right, customers will come back chastened and ready to listen.

Market Sentiment

Basically, after getting in the game buy buying 3 to 5 broadly diversified vehicles, you should do nothing. In 2017, if you followed that strategy, so far you are making a mere 20%. Since the vast majority of investing operations on Wall Street are performed by networked machines that monitor every price tick and move great mountains of capital for millions of worldwide financial vehicles, there is no human sentiment involved.

When you as a small investor get the news of sharp price movement, it is too late to act, unless you think and make decisions at light speed and are plugged directly into markets.

  • Machines do not agonize over decisions such as Buy, Sell or Hold.
  • Machines have no hearts. Machines do not succumb to sentiment. Machines do not read the newspapers.
  • Machines do not hold on to send their kids to college.
  • Machines do not save pennies to accrue the down payment on a house.

Nevertheless modern Wizards want us to believe market sentiment exists and that t hey are plugged into that sentiment.

Yeah. Sure. Right. Got it. Roger that.

How do TV Wizards get away with recommending buying or selling new assets every day?

kramer7

Sells perpetual panic and urgency

The fact is that while our money trickles into pension funds, 401ks, college funds, health insurance funds, and all the rest of the vehicles invented by Wizards to lure us with illusions of safety in an uncertain world, machines–owned assets are being sold.  There’s a buyer for every seller, Binky. Remember that.

Machines sell in torrents. We pray for 7 to 10 percent each year, are happy to get 3%, but when the algorithms indicate “Sell,” prices drop 20 to 50 percent in minutes.
Sentiment? Level playing field?

A Warning

Dollar$ is aware that sharp price moves can be precipitated by events and non-events such as national elections. If you think the US is going to hell in a handcart, do you also believe that after crap hits the fan that the money you buried in the backyard will buy a can of tuna?

This is why reasoned investors await blood on the floor before buying, and unless you are within 5 years of a financial goal–retirement, your kid’s first year of college, that down payment on your house–sit tight, never sell.

  • Buy and hold.
  • Ignore alleged “corrections.”
  • Sleep at night.

FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS: INVESTING –THE EIGHT DO’s

In Business, Economics, EDUCATION, Finance, FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS, Personal Finance, Wall Street on April 23, 2014 at 12:17 pm

If you are unsure you should dip your trembling toe into investment waters, reread FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS: INVESTING – THE DON’TS right here at Dollar$.

 CAUTION TO THE HARDHEADED 

If you are persuaded that the game is rigged and that age hates youth, deliberately having made money management and life-planning a cruel losing joke, consider that the bad guys will someday kick the bucket.  When they do, will you be among ageing schmucks still claiming injustice or do you want to position yourself to take your place as a leader?

The choice is yours.

If you are a twenty-something ready to grow up, or a thirty-something ready to take your share of the American Dream, you have  come to the right place.

Dollar$ will not equivocate. Here is what you must do to GET RICH SLOWLY.

Should you discover you need to get rich quickly, Dollar$ urges you to bet on race horses. At any racetrack, you will breathe fresh air, find friendly company, free parking, and can probably purchase a half-decent meal. You will quickly go broke, of course, but during the 1:12 it takes for a decent thoroughbred to run 6 furlongs you can scream yourself silly and dream of riches. Quarter horse racing is even faster!

OPEN AN ACCOUNT

Choose a brokerage like Schwab or Ameritrade, any organization that fits your digital lifestyle. Investigate apps or web sites; choose the brokerage that seems most navigable to you for research, purchasing, and tracking your holdings. You will want more as you learn more, but you need to be comfortable with an interface.

The Internet has leveled the cost of doing business, about $7.95 for any online stock trade, so in terms of costs brokerage firms are interchangeable.  At issue for you is service and minimums.

Most brokerages require a minimum amount to open an account: as this is written, Schwab is asking for a measly $500—perfect for the Clueless.

FEATURES

  1. Options. If you can get approved for Options trading, get it.  You will not use this until you have considerable wealth, but it costs nothing to check a box.
  2.  Margin.  Again, check it off and leave it the hell alone until you know what the hell you are doing, and even then think very, very, carefully about borrowing money from your broker to make an asset purchase—which is what Margin trading is about. Remember, your broker is not your partner. Your gains are your gains alone (W00t W00t!), but your losses are your losses alone. If you owe a margin debt, you will owe what you owe no matter what happens.
Margin accounts may have uses, but can be dangerous.

Margin accounts may have uses, but can be dangerous.

You know Tony down at the docks? The guy who lends money to people with no collateral? He is happiest when you pay him, but he does not care if your team lost, the deal went south, or your honey made off with your boodle—he only wants his money and interest back. When he does not get it, he becomes surly. He makes you sell your car, cash in in your kid’s college fund, and if necessary persuade you to these measures by realigning your knee caps with a baseball bat he keeps handy for just that purpose.

Think of your Margin account as Tony. Don’t let anyone get medieval on you.

3. Check Writing. Take it.  Add a measure of liquidity to your assets. You can write an emergency check if you need to—which you should not, but shit happens.

4. Reinvest Dividends. Absolutely. Dividends are how companies share profits with shareholders. Dividends are not interest, but in effect, reinvesting dividends is how your account will draw compound interest.

“He who understands compound interest , earns it ... he who doesn't ... pays it.” Einstein

“He who understands compound interest , earns it … he who doesn’t … pays it.”
Einstein

 

THE EIGHT DO’S AND WHY

1. Buy stock in at least 3 companies traded on either the New York Stock exchange or the OTC (Over the Counter) markets. Be sure these companies are in very different economic sectors. In other words, do not buy 3 media companies, or 3 retail companies, or 3 technology companies, but perhaps buy 1 of each.

You require a measure of diversity. You can buy diversity in a mutual fund, of course, a basket of stocks managed by professionals, but then you pay fees for professional management. Dollar$ cautions the clueless, who by definition are starting small, that the fees will bleed you white. Why start your financial life with a tapeworm?

Diversity is insurance against misfortune. While one sector of the economy may take a hit from unexpected circumstances—such as a change in a government regulatory posture or a political event in a faraway country— the only circumstance that will affect all 3 of your sectors are changes in the overall economic picture, such as a change in interest rates.  For the investor who wants to GET RICH SLOWLY, those dips can be shrugged off because unlike you and me, companies that sell goods and services can within limits raise their prices to recoup what was lost. The price of lumber goes up, the furniture business takes a hit, but next year the price of furniture rises. It’s not as though people will start sitting on the floor.

What constitutes a sector is very subjective. Is Walt Disney a service company or a media company?  Different online research will yield different sector guides. Here is one website that will allow you to bore down to Market Cap leaders by sector.

The final arbiter of what is what is you, Binky, so give special considerations to companies that are conglomerates. General Electric, the oldest company in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, founded by Thomas Edison, makes washing machines, jet engines, and runs an insurance business.  What sector is that?

2. Buy stock in companies that are at least 20 years old.

Ten-year-old companies have a modest track record of survival; twenty-year-olds are even better.

Yes, Dollar$ is aware that young companies are set to grow quickly, but they frequently are headed by untried management and are closer to going broke. Most corporations live little more than a person’s lifetime though the exceptions are remarkablebecause they embrace a culture of change and innovation. 3M Corporation was founded in 1902 to make sandpaper; now they make Post-It notes and Scotch Tape.

Young companies will also gather imitators, which mean ever-increasing competition will drive revenues, but not costs, downward. Someone is bound to improve on the original idea.  If the good Lord in 1985 had whispered in your ear, “Computers,” you may have chuckled at the Divine Wisdom that loaded your portfolio with Kaypro, Atari, Commodore, and Wang. Like last winter’s snow, those companies are now gone.

Avoid the bleeding edge.

3. Buy stock in at least two companies that are multinationals.

DSC_0230Doing business in places where general economic growth is not dependent on the value of US currency is simply prudent. Dollar$ would never bet against the financial muscle of the United States, but Dollar$ is aware that infrastructure build-out in the 3rd world is inevitably followed by consumer demand for a higher standard of living. You do not have to buy stock in a Chinese company to participate in the Chinese economy; you do not need to need to buy stock in a Chilean company to participate in the Chilean economy.  Logos and trademarks Americans see every day are all over the world: UPS, Disney, Starbucks, Pizza Hut… the list is endless.

If you have qualms about such things and think they are imperialistic, ask the folks in Red Square how they like burgers at McDonald’s, or ask Chinese citizens if the prefer iPhones to ‘Droids.

4. Buy stock in companies that pay dividends or, even better, have a history of raising regularly dividends.

Many companies do not share their profits with shareholders via dividends because managers hoard cash for future business investment. While Dollar$ respects the managerial strategy, Dollar$ notes such companies do not suit a strategy to get rich slowly. The Clueless want an opportunity to have their dividends accrue ever more stock.

Better yet, companies that pay dividends suffer less in a downturn because their dividends offer investors a yield, a cushion against losses.

5. Buy and Hold—even if it means going white-knuckled.

On September 16, 2008 the general stock market as measured by the Dow Jones Industrial Average crashed 10 percent in a single day. The Buccaneers who ran major financial institutions were competing to take greater risks for greater profits than any responsible bank should, fudging on what “banking” meant. On Sept 12, 2008 the DJIA was at 11,421.99.  By November 21, it was down to 8046.42 a breathtaking loss of 29 percent in 6 weeks.

Iceland went broke, Lehman Brothers went out of business, and for the first time ever, US citizens heard the phrase, “Too big to fail.”

Anyone who sold to defend his or her assets for fear of total ruin took themselves out of the game. They may have felt safer, but by doing so, they gave up any chance of recovery.

As Dollar$ writes, the DJIA stands above 16,000—which means sellers in 2008 have missed 100 percent gains measured from then, only six years. By selling into a panic, they gave up every opportunity to gain back all they lost and more.

True, if you owned stock in Lehman Brothers you took it in the neck, but if you had a diversified portfolio, over all, you survived and may have even made money.

A wise man once said, “You can’t go broke on a small profit.”

6. Buy shares and add to your portfolio regularly.

Ideally, you may be able to invest with a check-off system from your salary, an arrangement that will allow even those of us lacking personal discipline to take advantage of the maxim: Pay Yourself First.

Regular investing will allow you to take advantage of “dollar-cost averaging.” When stocks are up, you’ll buy fewer shares: when stocks are down, you’ll buy more shares. On average your cost will be somewhere in between. Free yourself from trying to guess if today or tomorrow are better days to buy; let time be your friend.

If your companies thrive and move steadily upwards, your average cost will always be below their current price level.  Over the long haul, stocks historically have gained 7-9 percent annually. Never try to time the market—just be a steady buyer and Get Rich Slowly.

7. Buy Mid and Large Cap companies.

“Cap” refers to capitalization, the sum total of the value of all the shares issued by a company.  Every company issues a different number of shares, so a company floating a million shares priced at $100 per share is worth $100 million dollars, but a company with 5 million shares priced at $50 per share is worth $250 million.  That’s right, the company trading at the lower price is worth more.

Large Cap companies are slow as battleships, but not likely to sink quickly; Mid Cap companies are more nimble and want nothing more than to grow to be Large Cap. They will take more risk, but have a record for taking risks and winning because they really were once Small Caps.

There are plenty of Small Cap companies, and investing in them is a respectable strategy, but Dollar$ does not recommend that to the Clueless: one needs a larger portfolio to overcome the inevitable losses small companies encounter. While a few Small Caps will experience spectacular growth, more will fail or stay stagnant. On average, an investor might do well, but only if the investor has a sufficiently diverse portfolio, unavailable to the Clueless without professional management—which must be paid for.

8. Sell when the reasons you bought a company change or the fundamentals of the business change.

You selected  XYZ company for your portfolio for reasons. Maybe you personally liked the product or the service; maybe liked the company’s competitive position; maybe you liked the company’s record for paying dividends; maybe you read and were persuaded by  the company’s strategic plans; ideally, you liked some combination of all of those.

But if those any of those change, why are you still holding the company? Never fall in love with a stock; review your portfolio regularly, at least every 3 years. Save your loyalty for a lover.

NOW WHAT

Discovering companies that fit the Dollar$ profile from the universe of thousands of companies is, in fact, easy.  You chose your broker because it offered digital tools for Research. Try the “screening” or “filtering” system—pick an economic sector, indicate your requirements in terms of dividends, choose from Large Cap or Mid Cap, etc.

  • Read about the company’s businesses. If you do not understand what they do, go no further. Invest only in what you understand.
  • Invest only in companies that sell services or products you would buy whether you were a business or a consumer.
  • Buy shares in companies that are ranked first or second in their industries.  
  • Be disciplined. Avoid trendy and hot stock tips, whether from your Uncle Fred or a TV pundit who is obliged to scream “news” at an audience every evening. Near term, they may be right: let someone else make that money while you sleep soundly.
  • Invest and relax—let your money work while you sleep and pay no attention to daily, monthly, or even annual trends. You are going for the long haul, and the long haul is steadily upward and has been for hundreds of years.

FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS: INVESTING – THE DON’TS

In Economics, Economy, EDUCATION, Finance, FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS on April 5, 2014 at 12:24 pm

OK, Binky, let’s check.

  • You have:
  • Paid off your consumer debt;
  • Are paying off your leveraged debt, such as student loans;
  • Measured and understand risk tolerance as a function of age and psychology;
  • Have wrestled the Beast of Consumer-Celebrity Culture to a stand-off and so are able to resist its psychological hold on you to impulse-buy consumer goods you neither want nor need,
  • Have for emergencies banked at least 3 months of expenses in a purely liquid account (6 months is better);
  • Insured against catastrophe—possibly through your employer; and
  • A reliable flow of revenue.
  • Accepted the Dollars$ plan to GET RICH SLOWLY.

Should you lack any of the above, Dollar$ wishes you well, but advises you to take control of your financial life before attempting to aggregate wealth by investing.

SHOULD NEVER HAVE SET SAIL

SHOULD NEVER HAVE SET SAIL

You do not want to attempt to sail across a stormy ocean in a vessel that leaks. If you are sailing with a partner, you may also risk thinking you need to jettison the love of your life—but that won’t plug the leaks in your boat.

Dollar$ is well aware of the gazillion investment gurus offering all manner of “free” advice designed to give the Clueless investor an illusion of control by suggesting investment strategies that invite Wizards into their lives. Wizards cast arcane spells that universally reduce to one spell.

Binky, since you are too stupid to be a Wizard, give us your money and for a modest fee we will take care of your investments for you.

Dollar$ maintains that  the basics of money management are simple enough for a carrot; he is also certain that Wizards blow smoke the better to separate the Clueless from their money. Further, he does not doubt for a moment that their pals, the Weasels, elected officials, structure American education so that Citizens remain ignorant of how they are getting screwed by Buccaneers.

Dollar$ fights the Power.

Expensive Necromancy

Wizards who take what seems like a pittance: 1.5 percent each year for money management are parasites sucking your lifeblood.

But they are not stupid. If they bleed you to death, they will require a new host. It is far better from the Wizard’s perspective to keep you walking around in a weakened state. That way, they feast forever.  They have this philosophy in common with tapeworms.

If the stock market goes up 7 percent in a year, but a Wizard takes 1.5 percent of that, the Wizard is skimming more than 20 percent of your gains. By the way, if the stock market goes down, the Wizard will mumble apologies, and still take his percentage, accelerating your losses. Your Wizard partner wins even when you lose.

Avoid Wizardry!

It’s your LIFE we are talking about!  If you are unwilling to take control of it, someone surely will!

DON’T hand your money over to someone or some institution, not even a mutual fund manager. If the benchmark of a mutual fund performance is, say, the S&P 500, or the Dow Jones Industrial Average, it stands to reason that managed funds MUST do worse almost every year because no manager is taking a percentage. In fact, 70 percent of all managed mutual funds under-perform their unmanaged benchmarks.

The Exceptions

Nothing beats an employer-sponsored retirement plan—a 401k for example. 401ks have rules that require professional money-management, so accept that.

Nothing beats an enforced, pre-tax investment vehicle for wealth accrual. Pony-up every dime you can up to the employer sponsored maximum. Tattoo on your leg the Dollar$ maxim: LEAVE NO MONEY ON THE TABLE. If your employer is matching even as little as $.25 on the dollar, why would you leave it in your employer’s pocket?

Even better, since a 401k is pre-tax money, it reduces your Federal taxes. Look, Binky, if you are in a 20 percent tax bracket, you have no other investment that pays a guaranteed 20 percent the moment you make the investment.

So let professional money management manage your 401k. If you are young, this is no time to be timid. Create a mix of aggressive mutual funds. When you get to 45-ish, you can become more defensive. But there will only be one time in your life when you can sustain and endure bad luck–NOW.

The other exception to resisting professional Wizard management is after you accrue $100,000 in investable money. Dollar$ would then reconsider your portfolio, as life will get complicated and you do not want to be worrying about finance while you are sipping rum drinks from coconuts on your vacation.

Then again, if you accrued $100,000, you are no longer among Clueless, are you?

DON’Ts

DON’T shake with envy over someone making a killing on a hot stock—your goal is to get rich slowly. Congratulate them; take solace in your slower but surer path to a comfortable old age or to aggregating the down payment for that first house.

DON’T pay attention to TV personalities who nightly scream about investments: they are under compulsion to say something new 5 nights each week. Surely, the investment landscape does not change so radically every 24 hours that yesterday’s strategy should be thrown out today.

DON’T pay attention to annual columns in magazines, online, or newspapers in which a bevy of Wizards name their top 3 or top 5 picks for the coming year. How is it that no two Wizards name the same list? Are they throwing darts or do they have a strategy? Could it be the publications want to annually run a second column about how they offer great advice because one of their professional touts will pick winners?

DON’T churn your portfolio. Make strategic plans and review them every 3 years. Markets will go up and down. Hold for the long haul.

DON’T sell in a sharp downturn: they call such moments “Panic” for a reason. Once you sell, you cannot recover. Investors who panicked in 2008 when the markets dropped and the Dow Jones Industrial Average left investors gasping after a plunge from above 14,000 to about 6,500 saw losses of 55 percent! Aaaagh!  Barf!  Rats! If they sold to defend what was left, they missed the subsequent rise that a mere 6 years later has the DJIA over 16,000.  What might have happened if they’d stayed the course and at deep discounts bought more?

If you are among the Clueless but setting out in a secure rowboat, pull at the oars and do not let the occasional storm swamp you.

There will be storms.

You will survive them.

 Coming Soon: The Dollar$ The Dos!

PERSONAL FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS: INVESTING, THE CAPITAL MARKETS

In Business, Economics, EDUCATION, Finance, FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS, Personal Finance, Wall Street on March 26, 2014 at 12:27 pm

Dollar$ is well aware of the gazillion resources online where some union of Wizards and Buccaneers blow rhetorical fog that is an alleged explanation of stocks and bonds.

Dollar$ submits that these explanations are deliberately arcane, part of the investment community’s strategy to hunt and bag the Clueless. After making what is simple appear complicated, up pops a talentless sales goon who for a small fee offers to manage your money.

 

WHERE WIZARD HIDE

WHERE WIZARDS LURK

Dollar$ seeks to dispel the fog.

When the Clueless understand what anyone can see, the Clueless are no longer clueless. No situation terrifies Buccaneers and Wizards more.

These are the same stalwarts that over a generation persuaded America that job training is a cost to be borne by the trainee and that education and job training are synonyms. An entire generation has accrued so much debt that they are indentured servants.

It is time to turn the table on the bastards.

Leap beyond the jargon of P/E ratios, large cap, small cap, technical analysis, book value and all the rest, grasp the basics, get started, refine your wisdom as you accrue wealth, seek financial and emotional independence.

A Fantasy

Suppose you are downloading 3 seasons of the Walking Dead because you are far too cool to watch broadcast TV at scheduled times, planning a long weekend of beer, pizza, a fluffy blanket, and a lover watching monsters eat brains. What could be more romantic?

Suddenly, as if in a vision, you imagine a way to supply the world with a new and better widget. Your lover shows up, you describe your plan, and your lover enthusiastically says, “We’ll need some money to get started, but eventually we will make wheelbarrows of dough.”

Hot damn!

Nothing comes easy, but after two years of running the business on a shoestring at 16 hours per day, you’ve proven the concept. You can make and deliver a quality widget for less. You need now to expand enough to get out of the basement. You want to hire some old-school experts in widgetry, and you need 10 employees. You are figuring with the profits that are forthcoming, eventually you will have 10,000 employees. The sky is the limit.

Scariest start-up ever

Scariest start-up ever

Do not laugh. This is how Amazon.com started, with Jeff Bezos sitting on the floor wrapping packages. This is how Facebook started, with Mark Zuckerberg gathering a cadre of code-writing geeks in a Harvard dorm. This is how Hewlett-Packard began—in a garage in Palo Alto. Maybe the scariest start-up in recent history was Fedex: on the first day in business in April 17, 1973, Fedex required 14 jets and 389 employees to deliver 186 packages to 25 cities. The idea was to compete with the US Post Office by charging MORE.

What lunatic would invest in that????

Ideas turn into goods and services that make our lives rich and our wallets fat. This is the miracle of America capitalism.

Capital Markets – Access the Money!

Participation in the public capital markets are the only way for Citizens to partake in that miracle.

Businesses go to the Bond Markets to borrow money. When a Citizen participates in the bond market, the Citizen becomes a lender. Lenders are guaranteed income determined by the face value of the bond, interest based on the rate of return, and an eventual return of principal at a predetermined date. Since part of the investor’s risk is the bankruptcy of the issuing organization, the rate of return (interest) is determined by how solid the issuing organization is.

Note that the investor does not participate in the growth of the issuing organization.

Note, too, that some organizations are not businesses promising interest based on future profits, but are municipalities promising interest payments based on future tax revenues.

Dollar$ hastens to point out that bonds are appropriate for investors with low risk tolerance—the aged and the nervous.

 

Citizen

Citizen

Dollar$ also points out that no investment is without risk. Ask Citizens who held bonds issued by the City of Detroit. Mostly, those bonds are held by large organizations such as labor union pensions funds, but when the fog lifts, those are Citizens. Instead of interest and eventual payment of principal, investors in Detroit’s bonds hope to get twenty cents on the dollar.

Businesses go to the Stock Market to sell shares in the company to willing investors who expect or hope that the good idea will make the value of the shares rise with the good fortune of the company. At some point, if the shares of stock are traded, the investor makes a gain or, if the value of shares goes down, incurs a loss.

For citizens to participate in the stock market requires only that the citizen have a broker, a clear idea of the advantages and disadvantages of different stock investment vehicles, and an investment strategy.

Dollar$ will be writing more soon.

FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS: INVESTING #2 – BURN YOUR PILLOW CASE

In Economics, Economy, EDUCATION, FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS, Personal Finance, Wall Street on March 19, 2014 at 12:30 pm

“OK, Dollar$, I have a few bucks in the bank, I have no significant consumer debt, and I have steady cash flow from a secure job. I have measured my risk tolerance in terms of my age and psychology, and I am persuaded that I want to get rich slowly to meet specific long term goals, such as buying a house, putting as yet unborn children through college, preparing for my own old age.”

Congratulations, Bunky! You are a grown-up! Its time to take your money out of a pillowcase.

photo-92-e1319326132194Tell your broke-ass friends who insist that the rich own the system and that they know they cannot get ahead that you have decided to join the Dark Side. Dollar$ adored Occupy Wall Street for its goals–who can argue with Justice? but Dollar$ sadly notes the “movement” lasted less than a year. So why not become one of those degenerate rich? While your friends bitch and moan, lusting for the next video game unit, having succumbed to the Consumer Culture that pollutes the mind by implanting false needs, you have decided to take control, take responsibility ad will rise above that.

You will never spend money frivolously or self-indulgently—that’s what children do—but you have goals, you have ambitions, and like it or not, all of us live in the sea of financial life.

You can choose to drown, float, or construct a ship to set sail.

Dollar$ wants you to set sail.

First, you’ll need to build a ship.

Save or Invest?

If you meet the Dollar$ profile, it will be plain that simply saving will have you sink not far from the dock. You work hard, so should your money.

Money in the bank is not working hard; however, it is totally liquid. You need to have some there for ordinary bills and expenses.

Dollar$ Recommendation: a balance of at least 3 months for the young (under 40), and as much as 6 months for the not very young. The Book of Ecclesaistes tells us:

I returned, and saw under the sun, that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all.

Or, as Dollar$ interprets The Good Book: Shit happens.

So DO Insure and save against the ay you will have bad luck. Everyone does. Do not let time and chance happenth on your watch.

Say you are minding your own business at a stop light when you get your leg crushed by a cement truck with failed brakes. If you have a disability policy or disability rider on your auto policy that kicks in after 6 months, it is a LOT less expensive than a policy that kicks in after 6 weeks. No sweat for you if you have some liquid assets in the bank, but a disaster if you are living check to check.

If you believe you are trapped, read Dollar$ on how to save more.

The Name of the Game is Averages

If someone offer you Magic Beans and a quick rich scheme, run. But the simple fact is that stocks show an average return of near 10 percent per year over the long term.  In this chart, the red lines are averages: notice, however, that some years are awful, and others are terrific.

Now you know what AVERAGE means.

avg-mkt-rtns-1926-2008-600x409

Some years are dogs; some are stellar.

Compare that average to current bank account returns, which as Dollar$ writes are less than 1 percent. Taking on some risk to average 10 percent seems mandatory instead of accepting a pittance.

Since you are following the Dollars motto, Get Rich Slowly, year-to-year gains and losses are of mildly passing interest. If losses of 10, 20 or even 40 percent trouble you—reset your gauge of Risk Tolerance.

The Marathon

We do not quit running after 2 miles because of a leg cramp. Shooting for an AVERAGE of 8 percent each year is realistic, possible, and will make you rich—slowly.

Think not?

This chart from JP Morgan shows three investors compounding their investments over time. One of them, Susan, starts at 25 and quits at 35.  She still winds up with a mere $850,000, enough dough to rent a tennis pro or two.

Growth over time

 

Dollar$ RecommendationWHAT ARE YOU WATING FOR????

Reassuring the Nervous

Suppose you are 25 years old and are able to invest $2,000 each year, maybe in an IRA, maybe in stocks–just keep it out of that pillowcase.  And after five years, you look with pride at your tidy pot of money. You are now 30, but just then the stock market crashes. They are leaping out of buildings on Wall Street. It’s as bad as the Great Depression—maybe worse.  The Depression lasted 12 years; it was 15 years of investor misery.  What happens to your Dollar$ plan?

Well you are all of 45 years old, a good 20 years from a youngish retirement.  If you’ve maintained investor discipline, you’ve accrued 15 years of investments at bargain basement prices. When the stock market recovers–and it will, since the United States is not going bankrupt any time soon– you may be lucky enough to enjoy a year like 2013, a whopping 32 percent gain in a single year.

All those cheap investments you made for 15 years are paying off! Buy cheap; sell dear! as log as you are dedicated to Get Rich Slowly, down markets are a buying opportunity, Bunky!

The sissie who bailed in 2008-09 go screwed. Those were bad years, and those investors with short term vision took it in the neck. They ran for the exits and took permanent losses because they took the short term view.

Now before someone tells Dollar$ that they were protecting themselves and, perhaps, were too close to retirement, Dollar$ will remind readers that being 65 these days is not old. Folks who are retired should prepare for at least 20 years more of life and so accept judicious risk. Any investor was over 70 in 2008 and had a significant pot of cash at risk….why? What are you? Invulnerable?

For the Dollar$ reader, the Clueless who are not H0peless, the lesson is plain:  Buy and hold, and do not let the vagaries of the markets year to year bother you.

Take a lesson from Monty Python.

Never bury what ain’t dead yet.

Convinced?

Watch for Finance for the Clueless: Investing #3 – Nuts and Bolts

FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS: INVESTING – BASICS 1

In Economy, EDUCATION, Finance, FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS, Personal Finance, Political Economy on March 15, 2014 at 12:45 pm
Get Rich Quick Wealth Generators

Get Rich Quick Wealth Generators

Dollar$ Disclaimer

Wall Street Wizards are touts. Touts are eager to sell you the names of winners. On Wall Street, thy will sell you the names of companies that will be fracking the shale deposits deep beneath Central Park once they obtain regulatory permission. They can supply you with the names of organizations accepting reservations for tourism to Mars; they have a list of companies exploring time travel. As wizards, they often use rhetoric that is in the subjunctive mood. They employ a lot of if, maybe, and might.Dollar$ will name no companies. If you want a tout, there are plenty online.Dollar$ Readers seeking to own a Caribbean Island before their 30th birthday are advised to select very wealthy parents or to take all their hard-earned cash and place it on a three race parlay of horses at odds of greater than 10:1, a payoff of a cool million with an initial wager of $1,000.  Bookies will welcome you! The Wolf of Wall Street, a film based on fact, details the life of a Wizard who preyed on investors seeking quick and extraordinary profits.Such investors in the trade are known as “Suckers”; such investment counselors are known as “Millionaires.”

Wall Steet Tout

Wall Steet Tout

Dollar$, therefore, suggests that the Clueless embrace two principles of investing:

Get Rich Slowly

Know It Ain’t Complicated

Indeed, Wizards’ claim to wizardry and Buccaneers guard their freedom to pillage the economically ignorant precisely because they seek to keep Citizens befuddled.

  • “Give us your money so we may guide you!”
  • “Buy shares in International Widget so we may be richer than gods while you struggle to make ends meet!”
  • “Pay us for financial education!”
  • “Do not ask for explanations: It requires higher math!”

Sounds familiar?

Dollar$ writes to  frustrate the bastards.

Should You Have Skin in the Game?

Money in a pillowcase is not secure. Never mind the risk of theft, that money draws no interest, and as such it decreases in purchasing value over time because of inflation.

Dollar$ notes that inflation is not, like Gravity, a Law of Nature. Japan for much of the past 20 years has experienced the opposite, deflation, a fearsome economic consequence of the untrammeled boom Japan enjoyed in the 1980s. Yen in a 20-year pillowcase can no buy more Tokyo real estate than it did two decades ago, which may seem like a great thing unless you bought your Tokyo condo 20 years ago, in which case it is now worth less than cheap sushi. In 2009 the US experienced a year of deflation—which (rightly) scared the piss out of people.

The Fed in the US has lately employed several strategies to avoid deflation tand maintain a comfortable inflation rate of around 3 percent. One strategy is to keep interest rates so low that businesses and consumers perceive Savings as having all the economic advantages of a pillowcase.

If you want more, perhaps it is time for you to consider Investing.

Drop that phone!

Investment Readiness

Not so fast, Bunky.

Investing means placing money at risk.

Never forget that risk-reward correlated. Your insured accounts have almost zero risk, and therefore pay near zero. Up to $250,000 in a US bank covered by FDIC cannot be lost. However, that 3-horse parlay of nags at 10:1 or more pays at so high a rate because it never happens. The true odds are 1,000:1. Someone may win the gazillion dollar lottery, but that’s called gambling, not investing.

You have no right putting your money at risk until.

  • You have a secure job that supplies enough cash flow to meet your expenses.
  • You have NO consumer debt.  If you remain ignorant of the difference between consumer debt and leverage, Dollar$ forgives you, but insists that you reread Dollar$ on How to Spend. The math is simple: should you invest in pursuit of earning 7 percent, or pay off debt where you are forking over 20 percent?
    • For the record, student debt is leverage.
  • You have at least 3 months of expenses in liquid accounts. Liquid means you can get your hands on it quickly.
    • Everyone thinks their job is secure until they show up at the office and find the doors padlocked.
  • You have assessed your risk tolerance.

Risk Tolerance

Glad you asked. Your tolerance for risk consists of two factors that measure your willingness to experience catastrophic losses.

Age. The younger you are, the more willing you should be to undertake risk. If you are in your 20s, if the US goes through 20 years of hard times, such as the Great Depression or Japan’s Deflation Agony, you will be in your 40s when the sun breaks through the clouds, still two decades from anything like retirement, and if you have maintained the Dollar$ steady get-rich-slowly program, you will have amassed assets at bargain basement rates.

Psychology. Never invest in any financial vehicle that will force you to lose sleep. Let someone else make that fortune: you have a life to lead, and your lover, children, and co-workers do not want you to be some sleep-deprived zombie lashing out at them because the $1,000 you put into International Widget has fallen to $800.

Are you ready to go forward?

What to do and when is coming soon!

FINANCE FOR THE CLUELESS:  INVESTING – BASICS 2